IEEE TALE 2018 – Call for VET and L&D Practitioner Participation

IEEE TALE 2018

Wollongong, NSW, Australia
4 – 7 December 2018

TALE is the IEEE Education Society’s premier conference series in the Asia-Pacific region. It aims to provide a forum for scholars and practitioners to share their knowledge and experience in STEM and technical education, as well as in technology-enabled educational innovation across a variety of academic and professional disciplines. This year’s theme, “Engineering Next-Generation Learning”, adopts a future-facing perspective in addressing this dual focus. To this end, both academic papers and practitioner-focused presentation proposals are solicited that relate to two distinct but interconnected strands:

1. Preparing the Next Generation of Engineers and Technologists
2. Next-Generation Learning Technologies, Approaches and Environments

Attendees of the EdVET 2018 Conference are being offered the opportunity to register to attend TALE 2018 at the discounted IEEE member rate, irrespective of whether they are IEEE members.

Extended Practitioner Submission Deadline:
17 September 2018

View more information at https://www.tale2018.org/ or download the PDF Call

Practitioner Presentation Opportunities

Note: TALE also offers an Academic Stream, intended for those wishing to publish papers in the refereed conference proceedings. Please see the website for more details.

Important Dates (for VET and L&D Stream only)

  • Proposal/Abstract Submission Deadline: 17 September 2018 (Extended)
  • Notification of Review Outcomes: 1 October 2018
  • Early-bird and Presenter Registration Deadline: 15 October 2018
  • Conference Dates: 4-7 December 2018

Core tracks / topics

  • Technology-Enhanced Learning
  • Online & Flexible Learning
  • Engineering Education (Tertiary)
  • Computing & IT Education (Tertiary)
  • STEM Education (K-12)
  • Laboratory Learning
  • Workplace & Industry-Based Learning
  • Community-Based & Informal Learning
  • International & Transnational Education
  • Equity, Diversity & Widening Participation

Special tracks

  • Engineering of Technologies for Learning: An Emerging Discipline
  • XR (VR/AR/MR) & Immersive Learning Environments
  • Big Data, Analytics & Machine Learning in Education

Keynote speakers

  • Dr Bror Saxberg, Vice President of Learning Science, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI), USA
  • Xiaochen (Susan) Zhang, Tech Entrepreneur, TEDx Speaker and Ex-Googler, China
  • Professor James Trevalyan, Faculty of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, The University of Western Australia
  • More to be announced soon!

Contact

secretariat@tale2018.org

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GDPR – How Moodle can help

If you have users on your site who users who are residents of Europe, then there are new GDPR requirements that are legally binding on your organisation. They relate to enforcing more rigorous processes for your users data privacy and your policies. These processes can be seen as improving our practices, and giving people more control over their personal data.

Two plugins are being added to Moodle to allow administrators to add a site policy that must be agreed to, and to allow users to see their personal data, and request it be removed if required (requests can be accepted or denied). This is an overview of how you can use Moodle to assist with complying with GDPR laws.

Data Privacy

This plugin will allow users to request to have their personal data removed and/or request a copy of their personal data.

Privacy Officer

You can create a role for a Privacy Officer (PO) in your site. Moodle originally referred to this role as a Data Protection Officer (DPO). PO is probably more appropriate.

A Privacy Officer can respond to data requests and see requests made, and requests denied, approved or awaiting approval and manage a Data Registry. If there is no-one with this role, the Administrator can respond to data requests and manage the Data Registry. There are permissions required for the Privacy Officer role.

Data requests

If a user requests a copy of their personal data, the PO can accept the request, and personal data that is held by Moodle can be downloaded in .json format.

If a user requests that their personal data is deleted, the request can be accepted or denied. NOTE: approving a request to remove personal data will delete the user, and the user can no longer use the site.

Policies­

This plugin will handle agreements for users of your site and privacy procedures – you need a web page with a clear and easy to read policy with information about users’ rights, how and why personal data is held, etc. An example Moodle Policy page is at https://moodlecloud.com/app/privacy .

Age of consent

On sites with self-registration allowed, you can ask users to verify their age before displaying the sign-up page. This helps protect your site from minors signing up without parental/guardian consent. An email address is provided to minors for further assistance.

Further Notes:

  1. Once user has passed the age check, they will see a link to the Policy Agreement, and have to acknowledge that they ‘understand and agree’ before logging in as usual.
  2. Existing users – once you set up the Policies page, when they next log in, existing users will see the new Policy page, and have to agree before logging in.
  3. You can set the age of consent for different countries. Default is 16. For sites used in other countries, the country codes to use can be found at Wikipedia.
  4. Once you have set the URL to a site policy, you can see it at <your site name>/user/policy.php ­

So how can I set this up in Moodle?

If you have the plugins in your site, in the Administration area, under Users – the TVC administrator will see a new area called Privacy and policies.

For further information, see Moodle documentation.

Important vs Urgent Skills

Andrew_Douch_croppedAndrew Douch is an independent education technology expert with 22 years’ classroom experience. He has won numerous awards for his work with emerging technologies in education, including the Microsoft Worldwide Innovative Teacher of the Year. His mantra is ‘You don’t need to be very good with technology to do very good things with technology’.

This is the first generation of STEM teachers who must choose between teaching important skills and teaching urgent skills.  In previous generations, there was no difference. The important skills were the urgent skills. Now there is a fork in the road, which presents a threshold challenge to STEM teachers in 2017.

“Importance” is about how much something matters. “Urgency” is about how soon it matters. In previous generations, it was understood that the more knowledge students had when leaving school, the better their career prospects. The urgency of exam preparation incentivised students to learn the important skills that would later underpin their career success. But that is no longer true.

There is a growing, collective understanding among STEM teachers that the skills which prepared yesterday’s students to thrive in a knowledge economy are inadequate preparation for today’s students. As information continues to be commoditised and processes automated, retaining knowledge is less important than it once was. It is still helpful for a student to know the first 20 elements of the periodic table, but failing to know them is a much smaller handicap than it was 20 years ago. After all, you can ask Siri what the atomic mass of copper is, should you ever need that information.

I’m not saying (as some do) that knowledge has no value, nor that looking something up (no matter how efficiently) is as good as remembering it. If students are ignorant on a topic, they have no filter through which to sift new information. In a “post-truth” world, critical thinking is more valuable than ever and critical thinking is problematic for someone who lacks the context that knowledge affords. Nevertheless, YouTube is a pretty effective knowledge prosthesis.

Creativity, problem-solving, resourcefulness, computational thinking… these are skills that have always been valuable but are now at a premium! Teachers get this. Every time I mention it in a presentation I notice teachers nodding. But there seems to be a disconnect between that understanding and the way many teachers plan their classes. Many of us still spend a large portion of our class time teaching knowledge. Why? Because in November students will sit an exam to answer questions that in any other context would be googleable! If we have failed to prepare them for that we will have let them down. We’ll not have done any favours for our own reputation, either! Personally, I don’t think exams effectively measure student learning in any meaningful way in 2017. But as a science teacher I have no influence over the State’s assessment processes (“God grant me the serenity…”). For as long as exams are the gate through which students must enter to pursue a STEM career, we need to hold that gate open for them.

Therein lies the dilemma we face in 2017. Do we spend our valuable class time on the most important or the most urgent things? Do we equip our students with the skills that will matter to them most, or those that will matter to them first? Do we prepare them to thrive in the economy of the future, or to thrive in the exams of November?

I don’t think we can neglect either! But clearly there is insufficient time to do both.

Since we are unlikely to be given more time, we need to make more efficient use of the time we have.

A common criticism of the flipped classroom model is that it is still a fundamentally didactic, teacher-centred approach. I don’t disagree with that – although if done well, I do think that it is much more student-centred than it might seem. Nevertheless, it is not my aim in this article to discuss different approaches to the flipped classroom model, how to do it well, nor to explain how it can be student-focussed. The point I want to make in this article, rather, is that it is much more efficient than traditional approaches. By taking didactic learning out of the classroom, class time is reclaimed for more “important” learning tasks, those which prepare students for the economy of their future. At the same time, it allows students to cover the “urgent” content they need for exams much more efficiently. They can, for example, listen to a lesson at double speed, while multi-tasking it with washing the dishes (or some other mindless chore), thereby saving precious at-desk study hours for other tasks. It also makes that kind of learning demonstrably more effective.

In many ways, I think the term “flipped learning” does a disservice to the concept of flipped learning by implying that it is the wrong-way-round. On the contrary, I think it should be the new normal – at least until we do away with high-stakes standardised testing.

Nobody races down to the bank during lunchtime any more, to withdraw cash during bank hours. Instead, we enjoy lunch with our colleagues in the staffroom. Then we multi-task cash-withdrawal with our grocery shopping that evening when the bank is closed. We don’t call it “flipped banking” – but that is what we are doing! We are using technology to time-shift a necessary, “urgent” errand to make more efficient use of our time, while also reclaiming our lunch time to rest and cultivate rapport with colleagues – both of which, are important but not urgent.

This blog has been re-published with the permission of Andrew Douch.

H5P Moodle Plugin – Tips for getting started

The H5P Moodle plugin is here! It is still quite a new plugin, but has excellent functionality!

See the H5P website for information about the amazing interactive options.

When you first download the plugin, you will need to install the content types that you want to use. Here are some tips that may help you get going.

Get familiar with the options

02There are heaps of content types available to use! Some of the most popular are:

  • Interactive video
  • Course presentation
  • Accordion
  • Chart
  • Find multiple hotspots
  • Drag and drop
  • Memory game
  • Timeline

You would be wise to check these out at the H5P web site before downloading them into your Moodle site. There are heaps of them and the list is growing…

How large is your site?

Do you have a small number of people creating content on your site – or maybe it’s just you?

If so, then you can have fun and download content types as you need them!

If you have a larger site, then you may want to restrict the number of activity types. The main reason for this is that it could be overwhelming for your course creators if there are too many options to start with.

You may decide to install all of them, it’s your call.

Note: Once a content type is uploaded there is currently no option to remove it.

The delete option has not been implemented in the Moodle H5P plugin as yet. If required, you can hide content types from your teachers (see instructions below).

Downloading content types

Many content type activities are available for you to install. To access these:

  1. Go to a course and turn on editing
  2. Add an H5P activity
  3. Click on the Editor options dropdown
  4. Click on All
  5. Click on Get to download the content type you require
  6. Go to [your site name]/mod/hvp/library_list.php
  7. Notice that the option is in the list

Don’t forget – once the content type is uploaded, there is currently no option to remove it.

03

Hiding installed content types

Do you want to prevent other content types from being downloaded?

  1. Go to [your Moodle URL]/admin/settings.php?section=modsettinghvp
    • Download button = never show
    • Use H5P Hub = untick
  2. Once these settings are in place, even you will not be able to install content types using the method described above. You will need to download the plugin from the H5P site and upload it to your Moodle site from [your Moodle URL]/mod/hvp/library_list.php. Of course you could temporarily reverse steps 1 and 2 above instead.

04

Prevent editing teachers from using particular content types

Have you downloaded a content type that you don’t want your teachers to see?
05If you want to restrict your editing teachers from using particular content types that are downloaded on your site:

  1. Go to [your Moodle URL]/mod/hvp/library_list.php and tick the Restricted box for the activities that you do not want used
  2. Go to the permissions for an Editing Teacher
  3. Search for H5P
  4. Use restricted libraries = Not set

Note: the teacher can see other content types but cannot download them. This may be frustrating or confusing for the teacher.

Limitations

Please note – there are concerns with using H5P:

  1. It is currently possible for people with programming skills to cheat in H5P interactions and obtain the full score without knowing the correct answers. H5P activities should not be used for exams or similar. I recommend you use the Moodle quiz instead.
  2. A content type that you install could inadvertently have content that may harm your site. As Administrator, you should know that the security of your Moodle site may rely on the ability of a third party to audit and sanitise HTML5/JavaScript code that may be uncontrollably installed with H5P. Admins are strongly advised to get familiar with the permission/restriction system of the plugin and pay attention to the plugin configuration.

Possible issues you may come up against

Issue Possible solution
You can’t restrict the activities? Check your permissions. mod/hvp:restrictlibraries should = Allow

06

You can’t download all the activities? Check your permissions. mod/hvp:updatelibraries should = Allow

07

You can’t download the Questionnaire? If you go to [your Moodle URL]/admin/settings.php?section=modsettinghvp, you can see that this requires a Learning Record Store to function properly.